Three NM Game Commissioners’ terms are up 12/31/15 — they need to be replaced

Note that the terms of 3 of these commissioners expire at the end of 2015. Their replacements will serve 4 years (2019). Lean hard on Governor Martinez to appoint new people to replace them, at least one representing those of us who hate the slaughter and butchering of public wildlife on public lands for private profit.

Notice the current representation:

Elizabeth “Beth” Atkinson Ryan [attorney, oil and gas, hunter, NRA] – 2015
Robert Espinoza, Sr. [hunter, NRA] – 2015
Paul M. Kienzle III [attorney, hunter] – 2015
William “Bill” Montoya [actual wildlife management training] – 2017
Ralph Ramos [hunter, guide] – 2018
Bob Ricklefs [rancher] – 2018
Thomas “Dick” Salopek [hunter, NRA] – 2017

New Mexico State Game Commissioners

Commissioner-Paul-Kienzle-New-Mexico-Game-Fish
Paul M. Kienzle III [attorney, hunter]
Chairman
P.O. Box 587
Albuquerque, NM 87103-0587
paul@kienzlelaw.com

Paul Kienzle is an attorney in Albuquerque. He hunts and fishes on public and private lands and is committed to protecting people’s right to do so. He enjoys shooting sports. He is passionate about New Mexico’s constitutional right to keep and bear arms for lawful hunting and recreation purposes. He is interested in putting more youth, adults and first-time hunters in the field. He was educated at Duke University and the University of Illinois College of Law. The New Mexico Senate confirmed his appointment Feb. 25, 2013. Kienzle represents Game Commission District Five. His term expires Dec. 31, 2015.

Commissioner-Bill-Montoya-New-Mexico-Game-Fish
William “Bill” Montoya [actual wildlife management training]
Vice-Chairman
125 Little Creek Hills Road
Alto, NM 88312-9503
Home: (575) 336-2533
Cell: (505) 412-0290
billmontoya@hotmail.com

Bill Montoya is a former director of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. He worked for the Department for 28 years, overseeing conservation and game management before taking over the director’s position. He is also the former president of the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. He holds a degree in wildlife management from New Mexico State University. The New Mexico Senate confirmed his appointment Feb. 25, 2013. Montoya represents Game Commission District 1. The district is composed of Curry, De Baca, Roosevelt, Chaves, Lincoln, Otero, Eddy and Lea counties. His term expires Dec. 31, 2017.


Robert Espinoza, Sr. [hunter, NRA]
P.O. Box 6792
Farmington, NM 87499
Work: (505) 324-8208
robert_nmgf@live.com

Robert Espinoza Sr. a resident of Farmington for more than 50 years, owns and operates a metal fabricating and construction business in Farmington along with his two sons, Tiger and Benny. He formerly served as President/Executive Director of United Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife New Mexico, and is active in several other sportsmen’s and conservation organizations, including the Mule Deer Foundation, National Rifle Association, Wild Sheep Foundation, Sportsmen and Landowners Coalition, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and Safari Club International. A lifelong avid sportsman, he devotes most of his time and efforts to promoting our hunting and fishing heritage in New Mexico and enhancing the habitat for New Mexico’s wildlife, with a big focus on promoting youth actives and opportunities. The New Mexico Senate confirmed his appointment Feb. 25, 2013. Espinoza represents Game Commission District 3. The district is composed of San Juan, McKinley, Cibola, Valencia, Sandoval, Los Alamos and Rio Arriba counties. His term ends Dec. 31, 2015.


Ralph Ramos [hunter, guide]
Las Cruces
Home: (575) 526-1314
ralphramos@comcast.net

Ralph Ramos, a native of Hurley in Grant County, is a Middle School Principal in Las Cruces, having served that community and Las Cruces Public Schools for 18 years. He has taught Agriscience and served as advisor to the local Future Farmers of America chapter for eight years before moving into administration. He holds a BS and MA in Agricultural Education from NMSU. He is a lifelong professional sportsman and guide and has hunted throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, and South Africa as he is currently serving as a hunting industry pro staff member. His passion is educating the public through articles and videography, as well as presenting elk and turkey calling seminars for Cabela’s, Bass Pro Shops, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and other organizations. He is a member of: Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, National Rifle Association, Mesilla Valley Sportsman’s Alliance. Ramos is one of two commissioners appointed at-large. His term expires with the close of the 2014 legislative session. His term expires Dec. 31, 2018.


Bob Ricklefs [rancher]
Cimarron
(575) 376-1123
bob.ricklefs@gmail.com

Robert Ricklefs has been ranch superintendent at Philmont Scout Ranch in northern New Mexico since 1981. He is in charge of wildlife management, livestock, agriculture, water rights, timber management and range management. He is a member of the Colfax regional water planning committee and is a founding member of the Cimarron Watershed Alliance. He contributed to the first black bear study in New Mexico and has been a cooperator in other New Mexico bear and cougar studies. He is a past member of the New Mexico Bureau of Land Management Advisory Council and currently serves as a board member with the New Mexico Cattle Growers Association. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Agriculture from the University of Wyoming. Ricklefs represents Game Commission District 4. In his personal time, he enjoys camping with family and grandchildren. His term expires Dec. 31, 2018.


Elizabeth Atkinson Ryan [attorney, oil and gas, hunter, NRA]
PO Box 1612
Roswell, NM 88202-1612
(575)291-7606
bethryanlawyer@gmail.com

An experienced oil, gas and energy attorney, Elizabeth “Beth” Atkinson Ryan focuses her practice in the areas of oil and gas title examination, regulatory, transactional, and everyday operational matters. Partnering with Joel M. Carson III, they created the law firm of Carson Ryan LLC in January 2014 after Ryan’s own firm, Ryan Law Firm, P.C. expanded at an extraordinary pace in 2012 and 2013. Appointed by Governor Susana Martinez in 2011, Beth just completed four years of service as a member of the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board (EIB). She is a member of the Board of Directors of the New Mexico Landman’s Association and is a Trustee of the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation. She is an active member of Safari Club International (SCI) and the local SENM SCI Chapter, National Rifle Association (NRA), and a voting member of the Chaves County DWI Planning Council, a subcommittee of the Chaves County Commission. Beth also serves on the Board of Directors of Lovelace Regional Hospital in Roswell. She has had a passion since a young age for hunting and outdoor adventure. Beth is a summa cum laude graduate of Lubbock Christian University with a B.A. in Humanities with an emphasis in pre-law and a minor in Biblical studies. She received her J.D. cum laude from Texas Tech University School of Law in 2006. Ryan is one of two commissioners appointed at-large. Her term expires Dec. 31, 2015.


Thomas “Dick” Salopek [hunter, NRA]
975 Holcomb Road
Las Cruces, NM 88007
Work: (575) 526-5946
Fax: (575) 526-0867
DickSalopek@hotmail.com

Dick Salopek of Las Cruces is a third-generation pecan farmer in the Mesilla Valley. He is an avid hunter, bowhunter and outdoorsman. He is co-owner of Tom Salopek Farms, Western Blend, Salopek 4-MP and Robledo Pecan Sorting. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Dona Ana County Planning & Zoning Commission, the New Mexico Pecan Grower’s Association, and is treasurer of the Dona Ana County Farm Bureau. Salopek has been on the Board of Councilors at Citizens Bank. He is also a member of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the National Rifle Association. He holds a B.A. in Agronomy and Soil Science from New Mexico State University. Salopek represents Game Commission District 2. The district is composed of Catron, Socorro, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, Sierra and Doña Ana counties. His term ends Dec. 31, 2017.

Clipped from: http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/commission/meet-the-commissioners/

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Posted in newmexico, wildlife | Tagged

Recall the fall of Scott Bidegain, the cowardly NM Game Commissioner, just over a year ago

With luck, we’ll be rid of all the self-serving fools on the New Mexico Game Commission. With that in mind, recall the fall of Scott Bidegain, who pocketed a wad of cash for setting up the slaughter of a cornered cougar by even-more-loathsome turds from Texas and Oklahoma. The noble Bidegain had previously participated in the sport of kings: coyote slaughtering. What a fine New Mexican!

Each of the current commissioners is of the same ilk and could be brought down by their own cruelty. Let us pray.

Scott Bidegain, outlaw

Game Commission leader resigns after cougar killing
By Staci Matlock, The New Mexican

State Game Commission chairman Scott Bidegain, who state conservation officers a week ago accused of helping four other men illegally kill a cougar on his family’s ranch near Tucumcari, resigned over the weekend. …

Cited along with Bidegain was Larry H. Webb of Newkirk; Billy G. Ivy of Canyon, Texas; Chad W. Hassell of Childress, Texas; and Jason E. Roselius of Oklahoma City. Roselius was cited for killing a cougar without a valid license. It is unclear whether the men shot the cougar or their dogs cornered and killed the cougar.

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Posted in newmexico, wildlife | Tagged

NM Game Commission

It’s time for a clean slate at the New Mexico Game Commission. All of these people should go. Their successors should include someone from a city, someone who enjoys hiking without killing. Instead, we have hunters, guides, ranchers, people in oil, people whose livelihood and pleasure derive from exploiting public land for profit.

New Mexico State Game Commissioners, from left:

nm game commission

Alexa Sandoval, Director
Bob Ricklefs,
Thomas “Dick” Salopek,
Paul M. Kienzle III, Chairman,
William “Bill” Montoya, Vice Chairman,
Elizabeth Atkinson Ryan,
Ralph Ramos, and
Robert Espinoza, Sr.

listen during their meeting at the Santa Fe Community College in Santa Fe, N.M. Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015. The New Mexico Game Commission has approved new hunting limits for bears and cougars around the state despite the protests of environmental groups. (Clyde Mueller/Santa Fe New Mexican via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

article link

Believe me, I’d love to indulge in Wanted posters of these folks and coy references to hunting them down, but I won’t indulge in the violence they endorse. I wish them peaceful lives out of public “service.” If I see one of them, I will flip him or her off. If I have mustard at hand, I will throw it on them. A better man would stand and stare and shake his head at their shame.

Flash mob, anyone?

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Posted in wildlands, wildlife |

June’s first full moon was the Thunder Moon

I’m a little late with this, between two moons.

Full Moon occurs on July 1st at 10:20 pm Eastern Daylight Time. This is the first of two Full Moons for the month; the next falls on the 31st. This Full Moon is popularly known as the Hay Moon, Buck Moon, or Thunder Moon. The latter seems particularly appropriate this year!

The Sky This Week for 6/23 to 6/30

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Posted in sky |

Exploring the mysteries of the ancient Pueblo people | GazetteXtra

gazette link

http://www.gazettextra.com/20150705/exploring_the_mysteries_of_the_ancient_pueblo_people

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Posted in Chaco, Mesa Verde |

And we’re back …

Some time in late December or early January, an update to WordPress locked me out of Ah, Wilderness! The website continued to display for visitors, but I was unable to add an entry or fix the problem, until now. The fix was much more trouble than it should have been and a big disappointment for me concerning WordPress, but now it is water under the bridge I almost set on fire.

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Posted in about this blog |

Moon Phases 2015, Northern Hemisphere

The first link is to a video of all of the phases of the moon in 2015. The second is the first tool I’ve seen that actually displays the moon phase for a given date and time. Pretty cool.

Moon Phases 2015, Northern Hemisphere | Flickr – Photo Sharing!

Moon Phases 2015, Northern Hemisphere

This visualization shows the Moon’s phase and libration at hourly intervals throughout 2015, as viewed from the northern hemisphere. Each frame represents one hour.

Moon Phases 2015, Northern Hemisphere | Flickr – Photo Sharing!

SVS: Moon Phase and Libration, 2015 (id 4236)

The animation archived on this page shows the geocentric phase, libration, position angle of the axis, and apparent diameter of the Moon throughout the year 2015, at hourly intervals.

SVS: Moon Phase and Libration, 2015 (id 4236)

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Posted in sky |

Happy Solstice, Everyone!

Stand still!

The Sky This Week, 2014 December 16 – 23 — Naval Oceanography Portal

The Winter Solstice occurs on the 21st at 6:03 pm EDT, marking the beginning of the astronomical season of winter.  At this time the Sun will reach its most southerly point along the ecliptic at a point above the Tropic of Capricorn some 5000 kilometers (3000 miles) south of the Hawai’ian Islands.  For those of us in the Northern Hemisphere this will also correspond to the shortest length of daylight we’ll experience for the year.  Here in Washington we’ll have just 9 hours 26 minutes between sunrise and sunset.  Of course, for our friends in the Southern Hemisphere, this marks the beginning of summer, and they see their shortest nights.

The December solstice has been an important yearly event that has been observed and commemorated by people since very ancient times.  In particular it was widely observed by the Neolithic people of Europe, and many of the ancient monuments that dot the landscapes of the British Isles and northern France were used to observe the passing of this special day.  Our modern holidays have been adapted from many of these ancient observances, many with a common theme of light to chase away the long winter darkness.  For ancient people this was a welcome turning point in the year since it portended the gradual return of the warming Sun and the (eventual) end of winter.

The Sky This Week, 2014 December 16 – 23 — Naval Oceanography Portal

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Posted in sky |

Long Night Full Moon 12/6 – and the earliest sunsets of the year

Watch the moon rise at sunset on 12/5-7.

The Sky This Week, 2014 December 2 – 9 — Naval Oceanography Portal

The Moon passes through the bright stars of the Great Winter Circle this week, a fitting backdrop for the most northerly Full Moon of the year, which occurs on 6th at 7:27 am Eastern Standard Time.  December’s Full Moon is popularly known as the Moon Before Yule, Cold Moon, or Long Night Moon.  The latter is particularly appropriate as we approach the year’s longest nights around the time of the Winter Solstice.  Watch Luna glide just a degree north of the bright star Aldebaran on the night of December 5th.  On the following night her bright crisp disc hovers above the figure of Orion, the Hunter.  

For most folks living in the mainland United States this week begins the series of phenomena associated with the winter solstice.  For the next 10 days we will experience the earliest sunsets of the year.  Here in Washington they occur at 4:46 pm EST.  By the 12th the sunset time slowly begins to creep a bit later; however, the time of latest sunrise is still advancing.  That event falls on the several days before and after January 4th.  Thus, when we measure the total length of daylight/night, we find that the year’s shortest day indeed does fall on the solstice on December 21st.  This “lag” in the times of sunrise and sunset is a result of our method of keeping time by using a standard second and by the slightly elliptical orbit of the Earth around the Sun.  If we still used sundials for keeping time the effect wouldn’t exist.

The Sky This Week, 2014 December 2 – 9 — Naval Oceanography Portal

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Posted in sky |

Thank you, World.

Thank you, reader, for reading, liking, sharing, and commenting. Peace.

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Posted in Uncategorized |

Damning wild rivers (yeah, I meant that)

A few people decided to take the last wild river in New Mexico away from all of us and sell it to a few. And no one can stop the few from screwing the many.

Interstate Stream Commission approves Gila River diversion | Albuquerque Journal News

At Monday’s meeting, Interstate Stream Commission staff acknowledged that evaporation and reservoir seepage will eat up nearly half the water before it ever reaches any farms or cities. The law under which the project would be built authorized 14,000 acre feet per year on average from the Gila, but the actual yield will likely be between 6,000 and 8,000 acre feet, ISC staff member Ali Effati told the commission.

Interstate Stream Commission approves Gila River diversion | Albuquerque Journal News

New Mexico commission makes Gila River decision | New Mexico Wilderness Alliance

The commission’s vote on the diversion recommendation was not unanimous. Commissioner Blane Sanchez objected and Topper Thorpe chose not to vote, a decision that spurred cheers from people in the audience who have been critical of diversion.

New Mexico commission makes Gila River decision | New Mexico Wilderness Alliance

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Posted in newmexico, wildlands |

Rock of ages: Up to 70,000 petroglyphs may exist along Mesa Prieta | Albuquerque Journal News

Slides at the link.

Rock of ages: Up to 70,000 petroglyphs may exist along Mesa Prieta | Albuquerque Journal News By Jackie Jadrnak / Journal North Reporter PUBLISHED: Friday, November 21, 2014 at 12:05 am

Along the entire Mesa Prieta, which stretches to the confluence of the Rio Grande and Rio Chama, and the first Spanish settlement of San Gabriel, some 70,000 petroglyphs are estimated to exist. They include abstract images, except for human handprints and animal footprints, from the Archaic Period (2,000 to 5,000 years ago), a host of human, animal, cosmic and geometric forms from the Puebloan Period (beginning in 1200 A.D.), and even more from the Historic Period, which begins with the Spanish arrival in 1598 around Ohkay Owingeh.

Rock of ages: Up to 70,000 petroglyphs may exist along Mesa Prieta | Albuquerque Journal News

http://mesaprietapetroglyphs.org/

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Posted in newmexico, Other Peoples |

Future of Chaco in question as oil and gas close in | New Mexico Wilderness Alliance

Our new Land Commissioner is likely to regard mineral extraction as more important than Chaco. Keep a sharp eye out and raise Hell over every threat to this treasure.

I like to drive to Chaco by going north out of Grants via Milan. The lower portion of this route is marred by old radioactive tailing ponds. However, my last trip a year or more ago I passed through a hellish landscape of smoke and dust as countless large machines ripped up the land. I’d like to see that on the 10 o’clock news and the front of the newspaper. Instead, this destruction goes on just out of sight of most travelers. Don’t let it get an inch closer to Chaco.

Future of Chaco in question as oil and gas close in | New Mexico Wilderness Alliance

In some ways, it still looks like it did centuries ago.

“Right now, you can stand at Pueblo Alto, look north and see a landscape that is substantially the same as what the Chacoans saw,” said Barbara West, former superintendent of the Chaco Culture National Historical Park.

But that could be changing.

Future of Chaco in question as oil and gas close in | New Mexico Wilderness Alliance

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Posted in Chaco, wildlands |

The Land Grab Out West By Senator MARTIN HEINRICH

In their typical multi-prong attack, the Republicans cut funding to public land services, then accuse those services of being unable to handle the task. The goal is to pass the lands to local governments where it will be much easier to bribe politicians and cherry-pick the best lands. When the burden of land management falls on local governments, they will fail and throw up their hands and sell the lands. ROBBERY!

If local governments happen to bankrupt themselves trying to manage public lands, all the better, because then local governments will have to beg corporations to take over a wider array of public services. This is the most transparent of vile schemes. [hat tip to Meg Adams]

The Land Grab Out West By Senator MARTIN HEINRICH

These types of land-grab schemes are as old as the railroads. But the chief salesman for this latest land seizure campaign, the American Lands Council, is having some success pitching state legislators on “model legislation” to enable these transfers. The legislation was drafted with the help of the conservative American Legislative Exchange Council, which receives financing from the utility industry and fossil-fuel producers.

It is unclear whether such legislation is even enforceable.

Continue reading the main story 423Comments

Still, even the Republican National Committee has bought the snake oil the American Lands Council is selling. Last January, the committee endorsed the transfer of public lands to the states. In addition, the United States House of Representatives, controlled by Republicans, endorsed the outright sale of our public lands.

Like other Westerners who value our shared lands as assets to be used, enjoyed and passed to future generations, I find this dispiriting to see. And for an overwhelming majority of public land users in the West who pay their grazing fees and play by the rules, the so-called Sagebrush Rebellion of Cliven Bundy and the American Lands Council is not so much a movement as another special-interest-financed boondoggle.

The Land Grab Out West – NYTimes.com

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Posted in newmexico, wildlands |